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Hard Rock / Heavy / Power / Melodic / Progressive Metal [Requests] » [REQS] Tracer (US-KY) - Tracer [7" EP] (1979)
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Link/Source: https://www.discogs.com/Tracer-Tracer/release/5244133
One of the two releases of Zack Records, The other one is Ty Barc, Underground gem in Kentucky.
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I noticed that the songwriting credits on track 1 from Tracer's EP are the same names as on the Ty Barc 45. Could it be that Ty Barc changed their name & became Tracer, or were they just covering a Ty Barc song?
Apparently this was the Tracer line up on their EP:
Tony Lindsey: lead vocals
Jeff Brooks: Guitar, vocals
Kyle Frederick: Guitar, vocals
Mitchell Plumlee: Drums
David Dorris: Bass, Keyboards, Vocals
According to a commenter on youtube who was a Ty Barc roadie, Tony Lindsey was their singer and another commenter says that Ty Barc's guitarists name was Kyle Frederick, so it seems pretty certain that Tracer were either a continuation of TB with some different members or a re-christened version of the very same band.
Either way, i now have to hear this one as well. (please)

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Check here Riptorn: https://translate.google.com/translate? ... rev=search

"How did you decide on TyBarc“? What does it mean?

Kyle: Not a clue. I think Jeff Brooks is your best reference there. I always loved the name and the mystique surrounding it. During a serious lapse in judgment and at the request of an agent at a Detroit area booking agency, we changed the name to Tracer…tragic mistake."

Our Musical Memories: the amazing, enduring sound of TyBarc
by Jack Montgomery Dec 8, 2009 Updated Dec 8, 2016

Beginning in the 1970s and continuing even today, one of Bowling Green’s most well-known, and most beloved groups was called TyBarc. The band included Tony Lindsey, Kyle Fredrick, Jeff Brooks, David Dorris, Mitchell Plumlee and others. Making statements in their music and stage-apparel, they have cut a wide swath across the musical history of southern Kentucky that is remembered and continues till this day.

How did you come together as a group? Many bands had earlier versions. Is that true for TyBarc?

Tony: The band started in 1970-71 with Jeff Brooks, Jerry Brooks, Mitchell Plumlee, and Randy Johnson I joined soon after. Randy moved on and we continued as a four piece until the mid 70s. Kyle Fredrick was added on guitar and Bryan Grineager gave us a 3 guitar line up with Porsche Snodgrass and Linda Lewis on backing vocal. Jerry left and Trent Schafner was added on Bass. David Dorris replaced Trent we dropped the backing vocalist (Porsche Snodgrass and Linda Lewis) now we are a five piece Mitchell-Drums, Jeff-Guitar, Kyle-Guitar, David-Bass, and Me on Vocals.

Jeff: Tony, Mitchell and I started playing in high school with my brother, Jerry, on bass. My brother, Mitchell and I used to jam around and we thought Tony would be a good singer because he had cool hair and was the first person at our school to wear bell bottoms so we asked him over to jam. We later added Randy Johnson to share vocals with Tony. I think our first name was War Horse. We actually went to Nashville and recorded some original songs and had a record through there were only 2 copies I think. There were several other versions of the band before Kyle and David joined in the late 70's. That's when the name TyBarc was coined.

Kyle: My first experience was jamming in a basement on Louisville Road with Tony Lindsey, Jeff Brooks, Jerry Brooks (Jeff’s brother and the original bass player) and Mitchell Plumlee late in 1976 - This configuration was originally called War Horse, I believe – then TyBarc. When I was asked to join a few months later, the line up had changed to include: Tony, Jeff, Jerry, myself, Alan Borders (drums), Brian Grineager (guitar) and Porsche Snodgrass (background vox) – we rehearsed then opened for Freddy Fender locally with those players. Very soon afterwards, the band morphed again with Tony, Jeff, Mitchell, David Dorris (bass) and myself and remained that way until early 1980.

David: My first contact with TyBarc, then War Horse I believe, was through Mitch. I began my playing days in Jr. High(Potter Gray) playing and learning alongside Jeff Jones(drums). Jeff and I played together in many highly forgettable bands such of The Vigilantes, The Sound Epidemic and The Thirteenth Hour (where we learned what a bass was playing for a WKU event). Then came The Bitter Sweet where one incarnation included a young rocker from Warren County named Sam Bush. Sam played my electric guitar since I was now a bass player. We won a talent contest and played a couple of tunes on Ch 4 WSM. Roy Acuff came to watch.

Sam, Jeff and I played as a trio a couple of times. Cleared many a dance floor playing extended versions of Cream songs. After Sam moved to Louisville to begin a new form of music, Jeff and I continued in Mass Confusion and Off My Back (Mike Clark, Johnny Hawkins).

Somewhere in here Jeff met Mitch at Warren East and began giving Mitchell drum lessons. I think I met Mitch at the Red Ace service station on the By-Pass. I was asked to give bass lessons to Jerry Brooks who played with Mitch, Jeff Brooks and Tony Lindsey. Didn't last too long. Jerry picked things up relatively fast. Guess I met Jeff and Tony around this time. I was a bit older and a year or two at this stage of life was a big difference.

By college I was playing in Friction, a 7 piece horn band. Jackie Frantz vocals and trumpet (she was Ted Mack winner), Jim Coryell (Larry's brother), Hal Neel on keys, Sam Foster drums (later played for Donnie and Marie). We were a jam band and played regularly.

I remember seeing a band play outside at Uncle Andy's Deli up on Center St next to campus. I noticed they were dressed for the 'big time' and performed as if they were in front of 10,000 people. Lots of creativity but they hadn't totally grown into their instruments then. Up close I saw it was Mitch, Tony, Jerry and Jeff. Must have been 'War Horse'.

Didn't see them play for a long while after that. I moved to Nashville for Recording School and upon return began 6 nights a week with Gary and Sue Goodman at Manhattan Towers. The next year, '74, I played at Opryland through the Fall and returned to Manhattan Towers. '75 was a 2 month USO tour of Europe then back to Manhattan Towers with a different band. Jeff Jones was on drums but it seems Mitch was around.

Somewhere in here I was invited to a jam in the Brooks' brothers basement with Jeff Brooks, Tony, Mitch and Mike Clark. The song we jammed on became Shangri la. Seems we jammed again in some country basement weeks later.

Heard from Mitch that he was playing with Tony and the Brooks and asked me to do sound for them at the BG Country Club. They were now called TyBarc. Marshalls and Country Clubs don't mix. Even with the guitars totally out of the mix, you couldn't hear the vocals. The band was happy with their performance and I did notice the original tunes were way above average.

By this time I'd graduated from WKU with a music degree, was the buyer for the Emporium Records and Tapes, and was playing country for Ronnie Lee with Jeff Jones on drums. One night Mitch showed up at our place on 14th and asked me if I'd consider producing TyBarc. I went to a rehearsal and agreed. Spent the next few weeks getting to know the tunes in person and via a work tape. Then Mitch dropped by again. He asked if I'd consider replacing Trent, the current bass player. I had to think about it. All great guys, good songs with that certain intangible but I was used to mixing things up a bit from night to night. (see jam band) Going from blues to rock to even Baroque. (Always described myself as a classically trained rocker with jazz tendencies) They gave me a couple of days and I honestly went back and forth. Trent was a good player, plus his harmony parts were important. Obviously I did say yes and got down to work. First thing I did was put my Gibson Les Paul Recording Bass under the bed (Too easy to overplay) and get out the '69 Fender Jazz. Second thing was to learn the tunes. After a few practices Mitch and I would stay after or come in early so we could lock things down. Till this day whenever the five of us (Tony, Jeff, Kyle and Mitch) play the TyBarc songs I play exactly the same bass line. Every part is dependent on the other. It's like reaching for a handhold in the dark.

Mitchell: TyBarc began on a school bus when Jeff Brooks asked me if I wanted to start a band. We were twelve or thirteen. Jeff had gotten a guitar for Christmas and his brother, Jerry, who was one year older, had gotten a bass. At the time, I had a weekend gig at the Main Office Lounge, and I’d been in a few other bands, but it was always with older guys who were in the late teens, twenties or thirties. So, when Jeff asked, I was excited about playing with people my own age.

We rehearsed in their mother’s basement. At first it was just the three of us. For a very brief period of time, Kim Richy, a schoolmate of ours at Warren East High School, also played guitar. But Kim’s real talent was his charm on stage; he couldn’t play on the same level as Jeff and Jerry, so he just sort of faded out of the picture. But just before he did, we played a school talent contest. Randy Johnson, who was Jerry’s age, heard us and asked if he could join the band.

Randy had a great voice, especially for singing softer stuff like, “If,” by Bread, or “Fire and Rain,” by James Taylor. We named the band, “Up Until The End.” I came up with the name because I thought it said something significant, that we were going to play music till the end of time. We won a talent contest at the Southern Kentucky Fair by playing Tina Turner’s version of, “Proud Mary.”

The day after graduating high school, I took drummer, Jeff Jones, place at Manhattan Towers Night Club. I was there six nights a week for a year. While there, I suppose people heard my drumming more. After I left that gig, I was asked to join a band with David Dorris on bass, Sheila Lawrence on vocals, Hal Neel III on keyboards and Gary Tom Smith on guitar. We named the band WISH. David and I worked together in that band for nearly a year before it broke up. We were rated Kentucky's number one dance band by the Courier Journal in Louisville. We played company parties, etc.

After that I did another year at Knight's Inn night club with the Lonely Souls Delegation. Just as I was getting ready to leave there, Tony and Jeff contacted me about recording with TyBarc. They had someone else playing bass by the name of Trent. I got together with Tony, Jeff, Kyle and Trent, but decided I didn't like Trent's bass playing as much as David's. So I suggested we ask David Dorris.

I can’t remember where our first gig was, but it seems like we played a couple of private parties before Tony Lindsey joined the band.

All of us had gone to Bristow School before Warren East was built. The first time I saw Tony, he was walking down the old wooden steps at Bristow. As I went up the stairs, I starred down at the steps. Suddenly, a huge pair of embroidered bell-bottom jeans obstructed my view. I looked up and saw a guy with long black hair and I must admit, I was a bit jealous. I’d had wanted to let my hair grow long but mother refused to let me, saying none of the other kids in school had long hair. That same day, I went home and told my mother I was letting my hair grow, and I insisted she buy me a pair of bellbottoms. Thanks to Tony’s fashion boldness, I was the second guy at Bristow with long hair and bellbottoms.

But it wasn’t until high school, that Tony and I met and talked. I suppose it was our mutual love of music and every thing rock & roll that finally led us to introduce ourselves to one another, probably somewhere around 1970. He invited me to his house. He had the coolest room. The walls were covered with posters of The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix and several other rockers from that era. He played several different records on the stereo. It was one of the cheap record players like I had at home; a flip top with a cloth-covered speaker. He hummed along with the songs, “Born To Be Wild,” by Steppenwolf, and “Satisfaction,” by the Rolling Stones. Occasionally, he sang out a full sentence or a chorus. I could tell he had a strong voice and asked him if he wanted to audition for our band. He said yes, with a keen look of satisfaction on his face. I’ve always thought Tony invited me over that day hopes of me asking that very question.

Neither of us were old enough to drive, but we hopped in a 1964 Chevy, which I believe was his dad’s car. Tony drove to Jeff and Jerry’s house. He sang, “Born To Be Wild.” When he finished, we asked him to join the band.

Having two lead singers worked out great. Randy sang the softer, more melodic stuff and Tony sang the hard-rock songs. Having a different image prompted a name change. My mother suggested, “War Horse,” because we just kept soldiering on at rock & roll. Everyone liked that name and we went with it. War Horse was the most versatile bands I’ve ever been in. We played everything from Merle Haggard’s “Okie From Muskogee,” to Black Sabbath’s “Paranoid.” We loved whatever songs we were doing and poured our heart and soul into ‘em. We copied the artist’s song, but not necessarily their style. We always put our own twist on each song and were hip into finding our own sound. We wrote our own songs and interwove them into the set list at all our gigs. It was notable to us that everyone liked our originals just as much, if not more, than the cover tunes.

As time progressed, we drifted into doing harder rock. It seemed Tony was singing more and more material. Tony and Jeff wrote a lot of songs together, so Tony sang most of our originals. That’s probably what led to the next evolution of the band. It was decided Randy was no longer needed. I don’t really remember being in on any of the discussions to let him go, but the decision was made. The band told Randy he was out after we finished playing a dance at Warren Central High School. It shocked me almost as much as it did Randy. It was an awful night. I hated it and will never forget the look of shock on his face when we told him. Randy was naturally upset and left in a huff, only to find he had a flat-tire. I stopped to help him change it, but he refused to let me. I still think it was a mistake.

It was the glamour rock days of David Bowie and Alice Cooper and we went full-tilt in that direction. We’d wear anything shocking on stage. Jeff and Jerry’s mom, Louise Shipley, had a woman’s dress shop in her house. Several of our shirts were women’s blouses. Tony made his own outfits. Most had more lace than Victoria’s Secret lingerie.

How did you decide on TyBarc“? What does it mean?

Jeff: I don't really know how or why we decided on TyBarc. Our standard answer was that Ty was Tony's cousin and barc is what is on a tree only with a "C". So it actually means nothing… just something different.

David: TyBarc - Tony's name.

Tony: Names came and went we used War Horse for a period as for TyBarc the name was meant to be just that like a person (Jethro Tull, Uriah Heep)

Kyle: Not a clue. I think Jeff Brooks is your best reference there. I always loved the name and the mystique surrounding it. During a serious lapse in judgment and at the request of an agent at a Detroit area booking agency, we changed the name to Tracer…tragic mistake.

Mitchell: The name War Horse just didn’t seem to fit a bunch of guys wearing make-up, silk pants and lace, do another name change was necessary. Tony came up with the name “TyBarc.” Ashamedly, I cannot remember how he thought of it, or what it means, but I do remember when I first heard it. We were in the basement. I stood by the old wooden steps that led upstairs. Tony’s voice was full of promise when he said, “We’ve got a new name. You’re gonna love it.” When he said, “TyBarc,” it was an epiphany moment, a picture forever frozen in my mind. I remember thinking “Wow. ” Somehow I knew that name was important to my life. That’s why I’ve never been overly concerned as to what it meant. TyBarc was our name. We were TyBarc.

From whom or from what bands did you draw your inspiration? Any local folks?

Tony: Like everyone the Beatles knocked me out. David Bowie and Alice Cooper were inspirations especially theatrically. But what made us different was that everyone in the band had different influences from progressive rock to southern rock. And speaking of those genres Avian and Slickrock were two of my favorite local bands.

Mitchell: TyBarc was heavily influenced by the British rockers. We covered songs by Black Sabbath, Cream, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and Jethro Tull. Of course, we played Jimi Hendrix, who was American, but his backup players, Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding, were British. I don’t think we realized it, or at least I didn’t, but we were being schooled to the British interpretation of American blues. But at the same time, we were all hip to the sound of American rock. We used to open our show with MC5’s, “Kick Out The Jams.” The power-chords and hard-riffs of Grand Funk Railroad was another band that crept into everything we did. I can remember Jeff, Jerry and I jamming for what seemed like hours on, “Are You Ready.”

We were very open to local musicians and listened to them whenever we could. One of my main influences was Mass Confusion, which had David ( Dork ) Dorris on bass and Jeff Jones on drums. I went to hear them every chance I got. Another band, Federal Duck, was a huge influence on Dorris and Jones, as well as myself. Foster played drums in Federal Duck. He taught Jones a lot of stuff about drumming. When Jones got kicked out of Bowling Green High School, he started riding my bus to Warren East and was a major influence on my musical taste and my drumming. Jones later when on to be Duck Butter’s drummer, which included Sam Bush, John Cowan, Kenny Lee Smith, Al Cooper and Bryon House.

During TyBarc’s early years, Kenny Lee Smith, originally of Barren County, was in another band, Buster Brown, with Rico Thomas, from Louisville, on bass, Steve Holmes, also of Louisville, on drums, and Bobby Richey, also from Barren County, on vocals. I think it’s fair to say that all of us in TyBarc went to see Buster Brown at every opportunity. Buster Brown’s hard edged boogie influenced Itchy Brother, who later became the Kentucky Headhunters.

TyBarc first got to know Itchy Brother by competing with them at various “battle of the bands” contests held in Barren Country, Allen County, Edmonson County and Warren County. Itchy Brother played a lot of similar material to TyBarc, i.e., Deep Purple, Zepplin, etc., but not the glam rock of Bowie and Cooper. We never felt any competition with Itchy Brother. They seemed to us as fellow travelers on the rock & roll highway. And as Slickrock, they were more of a boogie/blues band, their influence on us was more in their stage performance rather than the music.

By the time the members of TyBarc were in high school, Smith had joined a group called, Slickrock. They used to let us open for them at some of their gigs. So, it’s fair to say that Kenny Lee Smith was a major influence on TyBarc.

There were also several other local bands, such as Cherry Pop, Us Inc., Sons of Adam, Kaleidoscope, Friction, which also included David Dorris and Jeff Jones, who we watched often at a club at the top of hospital hill called 10th Street East.

But there were also local country musicians, such as Chick Chandler and Otis Blanton, who influenced us. One of the great things about the music scene in South Central Kentucky in the 1970s is that there was never a division between the rock and country bands. We all used to watch each other.

David: Inspiration? Playing wise: Jim Fielder (Blood Sweat and Tears), Jack Bruce (Cream), Tim Bogart (Vanilla Fudge), Ray Brown and Lenny White(yea I know he's a drummer) Overall: 60's-70's Top 40 radio, Bach, BS&T, Chick Corea, Cream, Beatles, Allman Brothers, Jethro Tull.

Kyle: Everywhere – all musical currency was welcome, accepted and adored (Bowie, The Who, AC/DC, Rod Stewart, Aerosmith, Hendrix, Rolling Stones, MC5, Nugent, T Rex, etc)

Jeff: I always liked hard rock, the Beatles as well as some sappy acoustic acts. At the time we were growing up Buster Brown was a big local band and then later Slickrock. I was kinda of inspired by the local following thay had and aspired to that as well. I really liked Aerosmith, Kansas, Rush and a lot of the "riff oriented" rock of the time. I guess the stuff I wrote was kind of in that vein.

With regard to your sound, what were you trying to achieve musically?

David: I wasn't trying to achieve anything sound wise other than capturing the sound of the band. We rehearsed every Mon-Thurs but never the night before a gig..

Tony: We always wanted to be different and we weren't afraid to push the boundaries musically and visually.

Jeff: I really just wanted to rock with some more complex riffs and changes but still have a catchy tune. We also wanted to have a visual impact also…..not just stand and play.

Kyle: Tight-as-a-drum-delicious-rock-and-roll…period.

Mitchell: As a band, TyBarc, had many discussions about our musical direction. Tony often spearheaded these discussions, always insisting we should not try to imitate anyone, but do whatever felt natural to us. In the early days, TyBarc was never worried about being pigeonholed into one genre. Jeff and Tony wrote ballads such as “Thinking Of You,” and then turned around and wrote rock songs like, “The Blues Of A Rock Band.” That desire to just do what came from our soul was the main reason we regrouped in the late 1976/77.

The original tunes written in that era of TyBarc varied a lot in style. Jeff and Tony wrote most of the songs. Some were melodic, such as, “Dreams Of A Madman,” and others were driving rock, blending the more progressive 70s music of Styx and Rush with Southern Rock, with songs such as “Shangri-La,” and “Whisper,” also written by Jeff and Tony. We were very eclectic.

Did you do a lot of original material? Who were the songwriters in the group?

Tony: YES, from the beginning we didn't want to be another bar band, we wanted to write songs, record and tour. Jeff always wrote four songs everybody's one. Jeff and I wrote a lot together Kyle and David were great writers and, Mitchell was always a big part of the arrangements.

Jeff: We started out playing covers and eventually worked into all original sets. Everyone contributed to the songs. Tony and I probably wrote the majority of the stuff but Kyle and David put a lot some good stuff out too. It was really a group effort.

Kyle: Ultimately, I believe we only performed original music. Jeff and Tony were responsible for most of the early compositions – later, we were all contributing individually and as a group.

David: Jeff Brooks was the main writer. He could have had something new every night. Tony worked hard to keep up co-writing lyrics and melody. Kyle was new to songwriting. He and Bill came up with 'On The Borderline'. We did a few of my tunes but I never thought my writing style fit the band well. I would go as far to say Jeff's song style is what defined the band. Jeff and I wrote a R&B groove ballad, 'Too Hot To Handle', for Tony. We played it but TyBarc was all about pushing the rock envelope.

Mitchell: When we regrouped in the 1976/77, we only played original material. Tony and Jeff were the major songwriters, but Kyle Frederick and David Dorris also wrote lyrics. But we all worked on the tunes as a group and gave our input on the arrangements. Often, someone would come in with lyrics and a melody, but it would change significantly when we collaborated on it as a group.

Were you able to do much touring? If so, where did you tour?

Mitchell: Wallace Barr, of Sound Seventy Productions in Nashville, managed TyBarc. He booked us on one to three week tours in the South with bands such as Black Oak Arkansas, Brownsville Station, Wet Willie, Jay Ferguson and a few others. We actually didn’t tour all that much. The legend is much greater than the truth. But we did some major arena shows with in Montgomery and Mobile, Ala. We also played as far south as Laredo, Texas.

Tony: Mostly the mid-west and south.

Kyle: A manager at a Nashville concert promotion company (who now sells golf carts in SC) took interest in TyBarc and introduced us to the aforementioned Detroit area booking agent and agency. The result were concerts across the southern and south-western United States touring with and opening for groups like Black Oak Arkansas, Brownsville Station and Wet Willie….for very little money. We also produced and headlined several of our own shows in Kentucky that always seemed to do quite well. There was a healthy festival scene during that era too; we were always very grateful for and fortunate to have solid fan support.

Jeff: We never went on any kind of extended tour but did play one nighters mainly. We were hooked up with Wallace Barr of Sound Seventy Productions in Nashville and we got to open for some "name" acts mostly around the south. Black Oak Arkansas, Brownsville Station, Wet Willie, Jay Fergurson to name some.

I’ve heard you did some recording and got a lot of local airplay. Can you tell us about it?

Kyle: Yes, we did a lot of recording in Nashville, TN and in various basement and home studios around KY. Jeff, Tony and his niece wrote a song called “Whisper” that became a local anthem of sorts. The first half was power-ballad-love-song; the second half was full-tilt-screaming guitars. Still a blast to play almost 30 years on. It actually charted on a regional radio reporting service – it was a smash. If all that happened today, I’m convinced that song would have given the group national recognition and a shot. I’m sure of it. The B-side was a song called “On The Borderline” written by me and Bill Lloyd. I remember driving down the 31W bypass in Bill’s Butterscotch Chevy Malibu listening to a local radio station when it came over the air-waves. We flipped-out, as you can imagine two teen-aged boys would do…really great times. A few vinyl 45s are still floating around – David Dorris would have a cache.

Tony: We recorded 9 songs at woodland studios in Nashville, TN, the song Whisper pended by Jeff and I was quite popular, it was most requested in the region for some time

David: After weeks of rehearsal we had enough tunes ready to record. I wanted to go to a small 8 track somewhere just to get used to the process of recording as I was the only member to record in a 'real' studio. I was out voted and we went to Woodland Studio in Nashville. (a few weeks after Kansas)

For basic tracks we recorded the band live without solos. Volume was still an issue. I had the bass going direct and you could hear the guitars bleeding through my pickups. At one point in the end of 'Whisper' we 'punched in' the entire band. (this was analog. ya got one try)

Danny Hilley was our engineer. He stayed late and often cutting us a $ break.

Overdubs when faster. Kyle and Jeff solos. Tony vocals. I added piano and strings. Brought in Randy Goodman, Trent Schafner and Kim Richey for backing vocals. Think Bill Lloyd came down too.

During mixing, I worked my day gig at the record store then my girlfriend would drive us to Nashville so I could sleep. While Danny and I mixed she studied and slept in the percussion room till the Sun came up and she'd drop me off at work. This went on for a week it seems.

OK, it is now Spring. We have a finished tape and still haven't played a gig together. I took a couple of songs over to J. Preston and Greg Pogue at Natural 97 (WLBJ FM) the AOR station who I knew from doing the soundtracks for all their station ID's. They played them as a favor but when the request line lit up Whisper made it into rotation. Whisper was the most requested song for six months

Jeff: At the time WLBJ Natural 97 fm radio station was the "cool" station in town and we were lucky that they played our stuff. "Whisper" was our most popular song and was the most requested song at the station for a while. The timing was right for us in that we were playing when there was a local station that would play and promote our music.

Mitchell: TyBarc regrouped in ’77 with Kyle Frederick and Jeff Brooks on guitar, David Dorris on bass, Tony Lindsey on vocals and me on drums. Two weeks later, we recorded eight original songs for a demo at Woodland Sound Studios in Nashville. We pitched it to Sound Seventy Productions in Nashville. They became our management company and Wallace Barr, who was also originally from Bowling Green, became our personal manager. They liked the song, “Whisper,” best, so we self-produced it on our own record lable, Zack Records, and pressed it as a 45 RPM. Natural 97, a local rock-radio station in Bowling Green, Ky., did us a huge favor and aired the song. It got so many requests that it was number one for either six or nine months. It also got airplay on Nashville’s rock station, KDF. Another cool thing about Whisper is that it was the last song we learned before going into the studio. We’d only played it a couple of times. And when we recorded it, it was a first-taker.

I’m sure you had many experiences as you were performing. Can you tell me about one or two that stand out in your memory?

Tony: It was a great experience being young in a rock band, such freedom, times I’ll never forget.

Mitchell: One of my favorite memories is playing the arena in Montgomery, Ala., with Black Oak Arkansas. We were told Montgomery’s former mayor had been very religious and had outlawed all rock concerts in the city. The show we played was the first concert they’d had in two years. The arena was packed and the crowd was ecstatic. They were practically climbing over one another to get closer to the stage.

When we opened the show for Brownsville Station in Mobile, Ala., we got three or four encores. After they started playing, several people left. Brownsville Station later complained that we had stolen some of their “brown” towels that they had in the green room. They used that as an excuse to say they didn’t want us touring with them anymore. But we knew it was because they just didn’t want to competition.

Another gig that stands out is a concert we did at the J.C. Pavilion, located at the Southern Kentucky Fairgrounds in Bowling Green, Ky. Jerry Wilson, better known as “Ness,” ( short for “Wildness,” ) was TyBarc’s light man and special effects guru. He used to rig up explosions that accompanied our act. The song, “Whisper,” was our big finale. An eight-beat drum roll introduces the end of the song. When I hit the snare at the end of that drum roll, Ness always had explosion. This show was during the same time period that Whisper was number one on Natural 97, so Ness decided to go all-out. He placed four flash pots on the corners of my drum riser and over packed them with an explosive powder. I was supposed to go straight into the last part of the song after I hit the snare, but the explosion was intense that it addled me. I remember being bent down over my drums with my hands over my face. Thankfully, Jeff, Kyle and David went right on playing. After a moment or two to regain my composure, I jumped in and finished the song. We had planned on doing one more song, but I was so shaken by the explosion that I just left the stage and walked outside after Whisper. Kyle came running franticly after me, asking, “What are you doing, Man, we’ve got another song?” My head felt sort of numb. I was sort of tingling all over. I went back in and finished the show, but I felt like I was in a dream. Thanks to Ness, I suffered from Rock & Roll Posttraumatic Stress Disorder ever since.

Jeff: The one gig that I always remember was in Montgomery Alabama when we were opening up for Black Oak Arkansas. It was the first concert that had been held in the venue since there was a large police arrest for an unruly concert some months ago. Tony decided to get everybody up and get the crowd loose…..and also invite everyone to our Hotel afterward. Then there was the time we drove 15 hours to Grifton North Carolina to open for Brownsville Station at a joint called The Redneck Saloon only to find that there had been a murder there the night before and Brownsville Station had cancelled. They wanted us to perform….I didn't want to be on that stage when the crowd discovered the headliners weren't showing. We went home!. Oh,… and the motorcycle races at Beech Bend….probably don't need to go into that one.

Kyle: Not without consulting my attorney and a litre of black cherry Jim Beam.

David: Our first gig as TyBarc was the 3rd Annual Appreciation Fest. It had rained and was still dripping from time to time. This was the last year of getting the bands to bring all their PA gear and hooking all up together. (I remember cause I was doing the hookin) Remember holding a speaker cable in one of the bass cabs while Southern Star was on stage cause it was the last cable! Tennessee Pulley Bone bailed cause of the weather and when TyBarc took the stage everyone was sitting back staying dry. After the first song the audience was on their feet in front of the stage. When we started into Whisper the crowd was singing along. There were encores.

I also remember when they were opening for 'Freddy Fender' in the Warren Central Gym. Think Jimi opening for The Monkees. This was when Country was Country and not just Rock with steel guitars. Freddy's audience was in for a surprise. Well I'd say the promoter had no clue but the guys had a PA and lights. The volume was uncontrollable. Being front and center, I needed a bodyguard. Every fader was down except for the vocals and the restrooms still ran out of toilet paper(ears). Still the band looked good and the tunes were coming together.

Didn’t TyBarc open for a number of bands including Black Oak Arkansas, Brownsville Station and even the New Grass Revival? What was that like?

Jeff: It was cool to be able to play with respected groups…you know, the venue is better ..the sound and lights are bigger. We were in a tough position without a major record deal. There is only so much you can do. It was hard to build upon those accomplishments without a product to sell nationally.

Mitchell: It was really unbelievable, really. It all happened so fast. We got back together as a group, recorded two weeks later and then within no time, we were opening for acts like Wet Willie, Brownsville Station, Black Oak Arkansas, Jay Ferguson and New Grass Revival. We were the only act Sound Seventy managed that didn’t have a record deal. At that time in rock &roll, opening acts had to have a major record deal, but Sound Seventy made an exception with us because they felt sure we were going to get signed to a major label. We opened the show for Wet Willie at the Agora Ballroom in Atlanta. As I watched Jimmy Hall perform, I remember thinking how thankful I was to be there. Once when another band member was complaining about us having to travel so much, I remember saying, “Man this is like a dream come true for me. I’m getting to play music, travel and get paid for it at the same time.”

Kyle: We were kids; it was a swirling blast of glam-liquor (see my notes above re Black Oak and Brownsville Station) The photo below was the 1978 Appreciation Fest, I believe we went on just before New Grass.

Tony: Yes we were fortunate to go out with some great bands, Black Oak, Brownsville Station, Jay Fergason, The Winters Brothers we did the appreciation fest with new grass and that was great. There were more shows just can't remember all of them

As the years passed, how have you seen did the band’s musical and interpersonal dynamics change?

Kyle: Lots of changes personally, professionally and musically, I’m sure. I have lived in Nashville now for almost 30 years and don’t get to play much or communicate much with Jeff or Mitchell. Tony and David and I, along with phenomenal-drummer, Fenner Castner now have a band called, BoomTemple. We write, record and rehearse relatively often and have plans to record an LP within the next year. It’s more a labor of love that aspiration of course, but still high fun.

Mitchell: That’s a political charged question I hesitate to answer truthfully. During TyBarc’s peak years in the 1970s, Tony and Jeff wrote most of our songs and the arrangements were more of a collaborative effort. But when we came back together in the 1990s, Kyle was the major songwriter. Between the 1970s and the 1990s, he had quite a bit of success in the music business, playing guitar for Earl Thomas Connley and Clay Walker. He had been Clay Walker’s band manager, so it seemed very natural for him to suggest someone play a riff here, or for me to keep my hi-hats open in a tune. He wasn’t over domineering about this at all, and many of his ideas were great, but it changed the dynamics of the band’s creativity. We’ve never had the same musical spark and magic as it did in the 70s, when it seemed to be more of a collective effort.

Also, Tony and David formed the Son Rhea Foundation, which is a non-profit charity to help underprivileged children afford the arts. Every year in December, Son Rhea puts on a concert, The Jambodian Holiday Bash, to raise money. These events became TyBarc’s major venue and the only time we played; therefore, TyBarc didn’t have the same urgency and spark as a band. We just mainly existed to come together for a benefit concert, rehashing the same old songs, with maybe one or two new ones, for a “reunion” show.

Jeff: I think we started to drift apart musically as the group and music in general started to change. The punk scene was starting to emerge but I was always just a hard rock guy. I think the other guys wanted to go more that direction. It's hard to keep a band together if nothing "happens". Of course we were always still friends…that's Rock n' Roll you know.

Tony: Like everyone you grow and change but we all stayed involved in music together or apart.

When did Hi-Fi emerge?

Tony: Kyle, David and I were into the new wave, The more pop side of things. (Cheap Trick, The Cars) We started the band Hi Fi with Kevin Lovelace on Drums and Doug Carman on Guitar and keyboards. We recorded 5 songs at Bill Bitner's Studio. The song writing was getting better and Better but we couldn't recapture the momentum of TyBarc.

David: Hi-Fi ….whole other thing.

Jeff: After I left.

Mitchell: Hi-Fi came about during the early 80s after Tony, David and Kyle kicked me and Jeff Brooks out of TyBarc. They wanted to continue, but much to their credit, not under the same name. I’ve always respected them for that decision.

Kyle: Hi-Fi was the by-product of TyBarc’s final chord. Tony, David and I stayed on and picked up Kevin Lovelace on drums and Doug Carmen on rhythm guitar/keys. We did some interesting covers, had some interesting conflicts and wrote several…interesting originals. We were in love with and wanted to be Cheap Trick. Big fun locally for a few months. Good band but not as original or motivated or focused as TyBarc.

I know you all regroup periodically and are involved with the Jambodians concert and the Son Rhea Foundation. Tell us about this aspect of your music.

Tony: We weren't getting together much until the Jambodian concerts started, and the Son Rhea Foundation was a way for us to give back to the community.

Jeff: It's fun to get together and play the old music and neat that people still remember some of that era. Tony has done a great thing by donating time and money to provide a musical experience to those who might not otherwise be able to afford to be involved. The concert helps to increase awareness as well as raise money. I'm always happy to help when I can though I don't play as much now.

Kyle: There is a remarkably rich history and lineage of players, bands and friends out of Bowling Green from the 1970s that convene at Christmas time each year because of the good work being done by Tony Lindsey and his charity organization, Son Rhea. David Dorris puts in countless hours on the annual Jambodians event as well. It is a moment for us all to enjoy each other’s company and stories and hopefully entertain those in attendance with our respective music, all for a good cause. Many who participate are still professionally active recording and touring artists. I set aside guitar professionally in 1999 and now enjoy working in the music business as a consultant. No more busses and planes, thank you.

Is there any one thing you’d like people to remember about TyBarc?

David: The band was a team effort. We worked songs till everything was right.

Kyle: It’s only rock and roll but we liked it…a lot.

Jeff: Hey…that we were just a good rock n roll band

Tony: Many thanks to our crew Jeff Watson, Jerry (Wildness) Wilson and to everyone who helped along the way.

Mitchell: We loved the art of writing good music and entertaining. We were on stage to provide a show, our songs were an avenue for a theatrical event.

Thanks so much. Is there anything else you’d like to add?

Jeff: Just thanks for keeping the memories alive.

Tony: Thanks to everyone who came to see us play and keep the faith.

Jack Montgomery is a librarian, author and associate professor at Western Kentucky University where he handles bookings for musical acts in University Libraries, Java City coffeehouse. Jack has also been a professional musician since 1969 and performs with a celtic quartet called Watersprite. Visit him at MySpace/shadowdancerjack


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Strappado wrote:Check here Riptorn: https://translate.google.com/translate? ... rev=search


Blimey, that's some nice sleuthing Emil!
Coming up with all that info makes my detective work look pretty half-arsed, but it seems i was on the right track at least . (=P)
Don't have the time/energy to read all that info just now, but i'll get to it tomorrow.
Thanks for digging all that info up.
(YY)

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Yeah it's a lot of text (violin) I just read some of it and saw that Tracer quote.
I found it thanks to your info in the post and with some help from google ;)

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Many thanks for the article! I'm from Kentucky, and had never heard of these guys until this request. Much appreciation for the knowledge!
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otcmetal wrote:Many thanks for the article! I'm from Kentucky, and had never heard of these guys until this request. Much appreciation for the knowledge!


If you're unfamiliar then you should check out the 1978 Ty Barc 45, 'Whispers/Borderline'.
It hits that sweet spot where Hard Rock overlaps with Southern Rock & is a treat for the ears.
Fingers crossed that the Tracer EP comes to light eventually.



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Strappado wrote:Yeah it's a lot of text (violin) I just read some of it and saw that Tracer quote.
I found it thanks to your info in the post and with some help from google ;)


Thanks agin for finding that piece Emil , i just got through reading it all & it was a fascinating article.
It's not often with obscure bands of this vintage that you can find this kind of in-depth information & thanks to so many of the original people involved contributing to the retelling it's a fully fleshed out history, rather than just one ex-members skewed memory which is often all you have to go on.

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No prob!

yeah it's a lot of interesting stuff in that article :)

I found Mitchell Plumlee on Facebook
Will send him a PM and ask about Tracer.

Keep you updated

https://i.imgur.com/FvLfeMm.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/kIdUMWX.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/Ry88RfK.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/to80QoD.jpg

Flyer: https://www.facebook.com/mitchell.pluml ... n__=%2CO*F
TyBarc 1977 / 78: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set ... 755&type=3
WARHORSE>TY BARC>HI FI: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set ... 380&type=3
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Strappado wrote:No prob!

yeah it's a lot of interesting stuff in that article :)

I found Mitchell Plumlee on Facebook
Will sind him a PM and ask about Tracer.

Keep you updated

https://www.facebook.com/mitchell.pluml ... n__=%2CO*F
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set ... 755&type=3
https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=102 ... 3369822380


Very cool! Your efforts are much appreciated.
I also happened across this small entry about Ty Barc in a book called 'Bowling Green Since 1950' by Amy Hughes Wood & Portia Beck Pennington.
https://i.postimg.cc/zXCmX8v7/Ty-Barc.jpg
And it turns out that Tony Lindsey and Kyle Frederick's new band BoomTemple have released 2 albums, 'Vaccine' & 'SoulJob'. They don't sound much like Ty Barc unfortunately, but if you like Cheap Trick for instance, this group would likely float your boat.

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thanks for the article! I got hold of Kyle who said he had mp3s and stuff with Ty Barc and The Alaskans + a lot of other stuff. He also have 6 copies of Tracer (smurk)

keep you posted

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Check your PMs Emil (:D)

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« Return to Hard Rock / Heavy / Power / Melodic / Progressive Metal [Requests]



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