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YEAH!! if you're planning to get a new amp there's no idea for me to nag about how to get the default setup to work.
You have already understood what to do (knight666)
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Oh yes, I thought about the new amp the minute you mentioned that It MUST be put between The player and PC (correct?) or the signal won't deliver?

Originally I did not know this. I assumed you could just plug Vinyl record player (non-USB also!) directly into the PC soundcard line-in without running it through amp first.

I thought It may be the easiest way to get my setup work as it's running now, by acquiring a new cheap amp) with both speaker systems working similarly. I just hope that amps are not too expensive :)

I guess my mistype in the pictures I put up caused some confusion as anything referred as "soundcard line-in" actually refers to "line-out".

But hey, it's good to know there are also other ways to work around this that You've explained in this topic also! This also means I can have a look on better vinyl player, so I'll try finding some info about that non-usb one that you (Strappado) mentioned (metal)

Cheers guys.

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An anlog turntable must have some kind of amp between the computer to get a signal.
The reason the USB player can be connected directly is becouse they often have a built-in amp.

You need something that makes the signal strong enough :)

Just ask in the store and they will explain what to buy and how to set it up (and hopefully not make it as confusing as this topic haha!:D)

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How to rip vinyl?

I did some google searches but it's still confuse for me. I recently got an old sound system, and I have a computer as well. I can send pictures later if needed.

This place has many (or maybe some) uploader which rip vinyls. Maybe your guys can teach me how to rip my vinyl albums? Do I need a high quality system? Cellphone application? Some sort of cable or sofware?

Thanks in advance.
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i use a ion vinyl usb turntable (wich my parents baught some years ago)

that is all i use, i know there are other uploaders here that use many different ways to rip vinyl, but i use a usb turntable wich cost alot of money oh and if you do rip vinyl, change the audio codecs, i have mine on 2 channels (dvd quailty) wich brings out a better sound

anyways good luck.
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What kind of amplifier do you have?

A RCA cable from the line-out/rec out on the amp to the input on the computer (usually a blue jack) should do the trick.
Rip with a program like Audacity.
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Strappado wrote:What kind of amplifier do you have?

A RCA cable from the line-out/rec out on the amp to the input on the computer (usually a blue jack) should do the trick.
Rip with a program like Audacity.


I use GoldWave to "capture" the vinyl sound to my PC.I use that from the beginning of my PC recording sessions.
I would add, to what Strappado said, that the RCA cable ends up to the motherboard or to the sound card, if you have one.
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Here's my system:

http://i.imgur.com/bPnJNQS.jpg


Looks like the amplifier is a "Gradiente AF/FM Quartz Synthesized DS-40".

Do I need one of those (same two audio plugs in both ends)?

http://s3.showmecables.com/images/catalog/product/RCA-Audio-Patch-Cable-Male-To-Male-1.jpg
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Recently when trying to rip vinyl again,
had to start using Audacity because the old WavLab program I have does not work, does not have updates for Windows7.
http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

this YouTube below explained simply what I needed to get Audacity to work, because there are a couple of small steps to do first I never knew before.

Plus since I have the MP3 Splitter & Joiner Pro program I bought, can edit into separate tracks there (instead of the headache where i still don't know how in Audacity).

Windows 7 - Record what you hear with Audacity
http://youtu.be/mjQ_qS-LaoU


as for tape decks/turntables - you need an adapter plug, or adapter cord to connect to the microphone or audio jack on the computer
you can buy one for cheap, usually won't be more than $10, at electronics shops, at dollar stores, stereo stores, department stores.
http://i.imgur.com/2dDS2bQ.jpg
http://www.swamp.net.au/images/producti ... /A_2xRCA(f)_1-8(m)_S.jpg
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Killtava wrote:Here's my system:

http://i.imgur.com/bPnJNQS.jpg


Looks like the amplifier is a "Gradiente AF/FM Quartz Synthesized DS-40".

Do I need one of those (same two audio plugs in both ends)?

http://s3.showmecables.com/images/catalog/product/RCA-Audio-Patch-Cable-Male-To-Male-1.jpg



canadaspaceman wrote:http://i.imgur.com/2dDS2bQ.jpg


You need one of those (yep)

Could you take a photo on the back of your system?
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Killtava wrote:Here's my system:

http://i.imgur.com/bPnJNQS.jpg

http://s3.showmecables.com/images/catalog/product/RCA-Audio-Patch-Cable-Male-To-Male-1.jpg


Whilst I appreciate that space in your home might be a factor, it's really not a good idea to stack a turntable (or, indeed, any component) above a receiver/amplifier, particularly a top-vented receiver/amplifier. The heat radiating into the bottom of the turntable base won't do the turntable any favours, especially any lubricated parts. There is also the issue of potential interference from the large power transformer in the receiver/amplifier to the low level of the cartridge.
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I'll describe my process for you and some notes about your/others potential setups and where they may differ:

My setup looks like this:

VPI Turntable -> Lehmann Black Cube Phono-Pre -> Rogue Metis Preamp -> Tape Out -> FocusRite Forte (External Soundcard)
My interconnects to the FocusRite are 1/8" mono jack to RCA adapter, you will require something different but more than likely will be the 3.5mm stereo -> RCA plug, but just in case can you post a picture of the rear of your setup?

I would start by making sure your cartridge is aligned, if it is not properly aligned you will get what is called IGD (Inner Grove Distortion) and the last song or two of each side will have a LOT of static and distortion. I would also consider replacing any cheap or old need that is on the table and replacing for the best cart you can possibly afford and have it professionally mounted

For you, it appears your system will have a built-in Phono-Pre on the receiver so you can skip that step, just hook it up according to the what the plugs say.

On your computer side, you really want LINE IN and not MIC for this. A microphone stage will add gain and cause distortion. If you dial this back to where it is NOT creating distortion you will loose information (depth of the material) so it's worth it if you plan to rip vinyl for playback/archival purposes to purchase an external sound card. External is preferred as internal cards pickup fan noise electrical hums and RF noise inside of the computer as well as hard drive vibrations. Some can be quite expensive but a great one that is reasonably prices is the Asus Xonar U7, overstock has them for $87 bucks right now which is a steal: Asus Xonar U7

1) The most important thing, CLEAN THE RECORD. At the very least, use a record brush and anti-static brush if you don't have the means for a wet wash whether manual or via a record cleaning machine.

2) Use A stylus brush to wipe any existing dust off the needle.

3) Acquire some software for recording (Audacity is good for Win/Lin/Mac), I use iZotope RX4 which servers the dual purpose of cleaning up the audio later on. If you don't want to spend $350 bucks on iZotope but have a MAC you can get a program for 20 or 30 bucks off the App Store which is pretty damned amazing at that price point "Vinyl Studio". I use it for splitting tracks and exporting my final audio downsampled (more on that later).

4) Set your levels (my sound card has them built into the the control panel app as well as on the device itself, so I use that). You should aim (as most vinyl is mastered this way) for -6db as the highest for most of the song and a MAXIMUM of -4db on your peaks! If you only have the graphical one in Audacity or something else they sometimes aren't spot on so I would make sure most music stays in the green and the peaks never go above yellow on the level meter bar (some apps like Audacity only has shades of green and they start really low so just figure out -6db).

5) Second most important thing: RAISE THE SAMPLING RATE! Recording at 44,100khz or 48,000khz and at 16bit will make the vinyl rip a waste of time. There are two reasons for this and one argument. The first being, it will never sound as good as mastered CD, period. The reason for this is you are recording not only the songs but also the clicks, pops and background hums (from the table's motor, from the electricity (there is a 60Hz hum in North America and 50Hz hum in Europe) and from your tuner/pre/soundcard. This additional information takes up space, space which is already being compressed from infinite analog sound to a sampled rate minimizing the actual music that we end up with. I record at 192,000khz/24-bit and usually end up with an 8-10GB file per album.

6) Record the album.

7) Clean the audio up. Audacity has some tools for clicks/pops but I find they suck. SoundForge ($49 for Windows) provides decent removal but it still doesn't satisfy me. Vinyl Studio for Mac does a REALLY REALLY good job at this, I would say second to iZotope (it's just that damned good and worth every penny if you rip a lot like I do). I'm not sure if there are any similar programs to Vinyl Studio for Windows as I haven't used it since Win98 but I cannot imagine there would not be one out there for cheap focused on this. Each piece of software should also have hiss/rumble/hum removal tools in some form or another which will allow you to select sections of the recording which contain no music only background noise and use that to tune the filter so that only that is removed from he original recording and all of the music is left unchanged. Sometimes a poor master recording can be enhanced when there is audible tape hiss from the reel to reel recording present on the vinyl making the final digital copy sound even better than the vinyl recording it came from. Here you will also want to check on things like overall volume of the recording and insure it sounds full and balanced. I HIGHLY recommend a decent set of headphones to use for listening to the playback while editing. Your PC audio speakers, full stereo or whatever will sound different! It will add it's own bass, midrange and treble to what you hear. I use a pair of AKG Q701s plugged into the headphone jack on my External sound card. These are a nice well rounded and neutral sounding headphone that has a great soundstage allowing you to hear everything not just some boomy bass or shrieking treble. The point is you need to hear the recording itself, not your playback equipment which is different than mine, Dick's or Jane's and can make a recording that sounded great to you on your system sound like a Miami Bass booty dancing song on someone else's system who has a subwoofer where as you may not have and adjusted accordingly so you could feel the kick drum in your chest.

8) Break up the recording, (I switch from iZotope to Vinyl Studio here as it searches your album art and track listing from discogs/amazon and makes for a simple export) you should be able to do this by using markers and exporting each as it's own two-channel track in whatever software you are using, in the process of exporting/saving the final audio I set my export sample rate to: 96,000khz/24-bit. This is a nice tradeoff in size and a full 40 minute album comes out to anywhere between 800MB to 1.2GB. I use ALAC (because i use iTunes) but FLAC is another great Lossless codec to use with good file size output. Here I take the field WAV files will be too big and WMA is not compatible with anything but certain versions of Windows and a pain in the dick to convert. As for conversion XLD (x-Lossless Decoder) is available on Lin/Mac/Win and works great for converting between formats.

9) Enjoy! Don't get discouraged if they don't come out great you first time, as you get familiar with the setup/software you will learn different tweaks that allow each rip you do to come out better than the previous one!

Let me know if any of that was confusing or you have any additional questions on how I do it.

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Wow, that was amazing. I'll try to buy this cable later.
But let's say I don't want the best sound quality I can get, but rather a great sound quality. :D
Ps: I have Audacity.

And here's the back of my Amplifier:

http://imgur.com/Thkt290,WJaw2tj

http://imgur.com/Thkt290,WJaw2tj#1

I hope it helps.
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Def. the RCA -> 3.5mm y-cable to line-in off the tuner would be what you want cable wise for just running into a standard pc input.

As for the sound quality, I would strive for recording/archiving/sharing at no less than 96khz/24bit, at the extreme minimum 48khz/24bit but def don't do 44khz/16bit! Otherwise it will sound worse than a CD for the reasons described. Washing/dusting/proper cartridge alignment are all super important to get rid of clicks/pops.

Here's an article from Audacity about it: How To Record Vinyl With Audactiy

I was looking around the other day and found this sound card which yourself and other members on here may want to seriously consider it has a built in phono-preamp with RIAA equalization! Soundblast X-Fi HD USB Soundcard
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I wish I could help regarding this subject but on the odd occasion I have tried to rip vinyl it has sounded like crap afterwards so I have given up on it for the time being. Maybe I need a better turntable or something :)
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NeeleSteele wrote:Def. the RCA -> 3.5mm y-cable to line-in off the tuner would be what you want cable wise for just running into a standard pc input.

As for the sound quality, I would strive for recording/archiving/sharing at no less than 96khz/24bit, at the extreme minimum 48khz/24bit but def don't do 44khz/16bit! Otherwise it will sound worse than a CD for the reasons described. Washing/dusting/proper cartridge alignment are all super important to get rid of clicks/pops.

Here's an article from Audacity about it: How To Record Vinyl With Audactiy

I was looking around the other day and found this sound card which yourself and other members on here may want to seriously consider it has a built in phono-preamp with RIAA equalization! Soundblast X-Fi HD USB Soundcard


The human ear can hear sounds between 12 Hz to 20.000 Hz.That high frequencies, close to 20 kHz, can only be heard by teenagers.
I have to admit that our ears can be "exercised", but for sure they can't be sensitive so as to hear frequencies above 20 kHz.
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Prince Hector wrote:
The human ear can hear sounds between 12 Hz to 20.000 Hz.That high frequencies, close to 20 kHz, can only be heard by teenagers.
I have to admit that our ears can be "exercised", but for sure they can't be sensitive so as to hear frequencies above 20 kHz.


Interesting article here on 24 bit 192kHz files:

http://xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html
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easternthunder wrote:
Prince Hector wrote:
The human ear can hear sounds between 12 Hz to 20.000 Hz.That high frequencies, close to 20 kHz, can only be heard by teenagers.
I have to admit that our ears can be "exercised", but for sure they can't be sensitive so as to hear frequencies above 20 kHz.


Interesting article here on 24 bit 192kHz files:

http://xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html


A very good article indeed.
I've just finished it.
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The most important part of the article stems directly around what we are doing, which is recording as it's not a pure transfer of the recording, the cart, preamp, etc. are all adding signal and noise to the recording you are making on your computer. The other reason is headroom and separation of the instruments vs. a compressed on top of one another feeling. While the range may be there, what you are really missing are the pieces of the recording that are not sampled. at 44,100 you are taking 44,100 "pictures" of the sound wave and reconstructing the missing pieces during playback vs. 96,000 "pictures" and playing back and assembling those to fill in the gaps. This is what a DAC does, the translation and assembly in as smooth as possible of a means without creating jitter. I have plenty of albums (Roberta Flack for example) where small nuances can be heard in the analog recording which are not present in CDs of the same album. Examples are a necklace bumping against the microphone or slight clearing of the throat or inhale/exhale between vocal parts. Some old jazz albums (BlueNote & Prestige) were so transparent you can hear the artists speaking to one another softly during songs and in-between. Maybe I have the trained ears, but I know on my equipment a huge difference can be detected from 44k to 96k and 192k not enough for the space tradeoff.

Other items to consider are the mastering techniques used for vinyl/cd. Information is discarded on a CD in order to compete with other music and sound louder (better to some people) where as vinyl is mastered at a lower volume with a hard cutoff on clipping where as digital clipping can go higher and higher it just sounds like shit. Vinyl also is mastered (if done properly) for where the track sits on the wax. Most albums will not put an extremely busy song near the inner groves due to distortion caused by the angle of the tonearm.


Excerpt I referenced:

When does 24 bit matter?

Professionals use 24 bit samples in recording and production [14] for headroom, noise floor, and convenience reasons.

16 bits is enough to span the real hearing range with room to spare. It does not span the entire possible signal range of audio equipment. The primary reason to use 24 bits when recording is to prevent mistakes; rather than being careful to center 16 bit recording-- risking clipping if you guess too high and adding noise if you guess too low-- 24 bits allows an operator to set an approximate level and not worry too much about it. Missing the optimal gain setting by a few bits has no consequences, and effects that dynamically compress the recorded range have a deep floor to work with.

An engineer also requires more than 16 bits during mixing and mastering. Modern work flows may involve literally thousands of effects and operations. The quantization noise and noise floor of a 16 bit sample may be undetectable during playback, but multiplying that noise by a few thousand times eventually becomes noticeable. 24 bits keeps the accumulated noise at a very low level. Once the music is ready to distribute, there's no reason to keep more than 16 bits.
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